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Archive for June, 2009

know I should have posted about this a long time ago, but I was reading the situation, finally, I concluded that ” IT IS A WISE ACTION AFTERALL “, … I’m alluding to the culling of pigs here in Egypt, despite the real intention for the government that led to culling of pigs, here what came in a “New York Times” article entitled: “How a Mild Virus Might Turn Vicious” … Dr. Palese was asked about another notion concerning likely mutations. There has been outrage at Egypt’s decision to kill all the pigs belonging to its Coptic Christian minority. It has been depicted as misguided and motivated by religious bigotry, because the “swine flu” is really now a human flu.
But Egypt is also in an especially dangerous situation. The new swine flu reached it just last week. The H5N1 avian flu has circulated in its backyard chickens since 2006, defying all eradication efforts. In the last year, dozens of H5N1 cases have been confirmed in toddlers, almost all of whom have survived — which led some experts to speculate that those are cases of a less lethal version of H5N1 that is better adapted to humans.
In that case, might it be wise to get rid of the country’s relatively small pig population, since pigs are “mixing vessels” that can catch both human and bird flus?
“I agree with the premise, if you really could eliminate an animal reservoir,” Dr. Palese said. “But the virus is out of pigs now — and it’s more important that those poor people have something to eat.” So I think that Allah protected us by guiding those people that gave orders to cull pigs to this action … concerning the “… those poor people have something to eat” !!!, I think we have lots of other types of meat they can consume (that’s all :)) … BUT WE WANT TO LIVE HEALTY & SAFE LIFE

horror2

know I should have posted about this a long time ago, but I think it is still a good time for that, especially after the arrival of the unwelcomed visitor called “swine flu H1N1″, but I was following upt the situation, finally, I concluded that ” IT IS A WISE ACTION AFTERALL “, … I’m alluding to the culling of pigs here in Egypt, despite the real intention for the government that led to culling of pigs, here what came in a “New York Times” article entitled: “How a Mild Virus Might Turn Vicious

“… Dr. Palese was asked about another notion concerning likely mutations. There has been outrage at Egypt’s decision to kill all the pigs belonging to its Coptic Christian minority. It has been depicted as misguided and motivated by religious bigotry, because the “swine flu” is really now a human flu.


But Egypt is also in an especially dangerous situation. The new swine flu reached it just last week. The H5N1 avian flu has circulated in its backyard chickens since 2006, defying all eradication efforts. In the last year, dozens of H5N1 cases have been confirmed in toddlers, almost all of whom have survived — which led some experts to speculate that those are cases of a less lethal version of H5N1 that is better adapted to humans.


In that case, might it be wise to get rid of the country’s relatively small pig population, since pigs are “mixing vessels” that can catch both human and bird flus?


“I agree with the premise, if you really could eliminate an animal reservoir,” Dr. Palese said. “But the virus is out of pigs now — and it’s more important that those poor people have something to eat.

So I think that Allah protected us by guiding those people that gave orders to cull pigs to this action … concerning the “… those poor people have something to eat” !!!, I think we have lots of other types of meat they can consume (that’s all :)) … BUT WE WANT TO LIVE HEALTY & SAFE LIFE


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The World Health Organization has recommended that health authorities in all nations being routinely vaccinating young children against rotavirus, which causes 500 000 diarrheal deaths and 2 million hospitalizations every year.

WHO, based in Geneva, Switzerland, said 85 percent of deaths caused by rotavirus occur in developing countries. it is hoped that WHO’s recommendation will spur the use of the vaccine in Asia and Africa. The vaccine is already recommended for use in the Americas and Europe.

The recommendation was made by a group called the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization, which reviewed evidence about the vaccine’s effectiveness. The group reviewed data from a clinical trial in South Africa and Malawi that found the vaccine cut severe diarrheal episodes.The vaccine is also being tested in clinical trials in Japan, India, Mali, Ghana, Kenya, Bangladesh and Vietnam.

“This WHO recommendation clears the way for vaccines that will protect children in the developing world from one of the most deadly diseases they face,” said Dr Tachi Yamada, President of the Global Health Program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, in a press release issued by WHO.

SOURCE ARTICLE: NATURE Blog

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Magazine Cover 13

Peace be Upon You All … and welcome to the new post of  ViroMag – The Weekly Virology Magazine

This week’s post is about ROTAVIRUS

Rotavirus is a genus of double-stranded RNA virus in the family Reoviridae.

The genome of rotavirus consists of 11 unique double helix molecules of RNA which are 18,555 nucleoside base-pairs in total. Each helix, or segment, is a gene, numbered 1 to 11 by decreasing size. Each gene codes for one protein, except genes 9 and 11, which each code for two. The RNA is surrounded by a three-layered icosahedral protein capsid. Viral particles are up to 76.5 nm in diameter and are not enveloped.

It is the leading single cause of severe diarrhoea among infants and young children. By the age of five, nearly every child in the world has been infected with rotavirus at least once. However, with each infection, immunity develops, subsequent infections are less severe, and adults are rarely affected.

There are seven species of this virus, referred to as A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Rotavirus A, the most common, causes more than 90% of infections in humans.

Rotavirus is transmitted by the faecal-oral route. It infects cells that line the small intestine and produces an enterotoxin, which induces gastroenteritis, leading to severe diarrhoea and sometimes death through dehydration.

Although rotavirus was discovered in 1973 and accounts for up to 50% of hospitalisations for severe diarrhoea in infants and children, its importance is still not widely known within the public health community, particularly in developing countries. In addition to its impact on human health, rotavirus also infects other animals, and is a pathogen of livestock.

More than 500,000 children under five years of age die from rotavirus infection each year and almost two million more become severely ill. In the United States, rotavirus causes about 2.7 million cases of severe gastroenteritis in children, almost 60,000 hospitalisations, and around 37 deaths each year. Public health campaigns to combat rotavirus focus on providing oral rehydration therapy for infected children and vaccination to prevent the disease.

Most symptomatic episodes occur in young children between the ages of 3 months and 2 years. The virus spreads rapidly, presumably through person-to-person contact, airborne droplets, or possibly contact with contaminated toys.


Symptoms usually appear approximately two to three days after infection, and include projectile vomiting and very watery diarrhoea, often with fever and abdominal pain. The first infection is usually the worst one.

ProTecT Your Child againsT RoTavirus

Treatment:

Treatment of acute rotavirus infection is nonspecific and involves management of symptoms and, most importantly, maintenance of hydration. If untreated, children can die from the resulting severe dehydration. Depending on the severity of diarrhoea, treatment consists of oral rehydration with plain water, water plus salts, or water plus salts and sugar. Some infections are serious enough to warrant hospitalisation where fluids are given by intravenous drip or nasogastric tube, and the child’s electrolytes and blood sugar are monitored.

Vaccines:

Today, there are vaccines that prevent the disease. These vaccines differ in how they are made and when they are given, but both are given orally and both will protect your child against rotavirus.

  • The RotaTeq® vaccine has been used since early 2006. Infants should receive this oral vaccine in three doses, at 2, 4, and 6 months of age.

  • The Rotarix® vaccine was approved in April 2008. This is also an oral vaccine. Infants should receive it at 2 and 4 months of age.

Most babies who get vaccinated with RotaTeq® or Rotarix® will not get diarrhea from rotavirus, and almost all of them will be protected from severe diarrhea caused by rotavirus. This means that babies who get vaccinated are much less likely to be hospitalized or to see a doctor because of diarrhea from rotavirus. The rotavirus vaccines may be given at the same time as other childhood vaccines.

More Information

CDC – Rotavirus

WHO – Rotavirus

Wiki – Rotavirus

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Avian influenza – situation in Egypt – update

2 June 2009 — The Ministry of Health of Egypt has reported a new confirmed human case of avian influenza A/H5N1 on 01 June 2009.

The case is a 4-year old female child from the Kefr El Sheikh District of Kefr El Sheikh Governorate. Her symptoms started on 30 May 2009 with fever, cough and sore throat. She was admitted to Kefr El Sheikh Fever Hospital on 31 May 2009. The patient received oseltamivir and is in a stable condition.

Investigations into the source of infection indicated that she had close contact with dead and sick poultry. The case was confirmed by the Egyptian Central Public Health Laboratories.

Of the 78 cases confirmed to date in Egypt, 27 have been fatal.

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